Why Is My Wine Fizzy

Have you ever poured yourself a glass of wine, and suddenly felt a surprising fizziness? If you’ve encountered this, you may be curious about the reason behind your sparkling wine. As a wine lover, I’ve …

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Have you ever poured yourself a glass of wine, and suddenly felt a surprising fizziness? If you’ve encountered this, you may be curious about the reason behind your sparkling wine. As a wine lover, I’ve faced this phenomenon and I would like to share some knowledge and personal encounters.

First and foremost, it’s important to note that not all wines are meant to be fizzy. In fact, most wines are still, meaning they have no bubbles or effervescence. However, there are certain wines, such as sparkling wines or some white wines, that are intentionally made to be fizzy.

But what if you’re drinking a wine that isn’t supposed to be fizzy? There are a few possible reasons for this unexpected carbonation. One common cause is refermentation in the bottle. This can occur when there are residual sugars or yeast present in the wine, which can ferment and produce carbon dioxide. This secondary fermentation can be triggered by various factors such as temperature changes or improper storage conditions.

Another possible reason for fizzy wine is a faulty closure. If the wine is sealed with a cork or screw cap that is not airtight, it can allow air (and in some cases, bacteria or yeast) to enter the bottle. This can lead to refermentation and the production of bubbles in the wine.

Additionally, certain winemaking techniques can result in a slight effervescence in wines that are not intended to be fizzy. For example, some winemakers purposely introduce a small amount of carbon dioxide during the fermentation process to enhance the wine’s aromas and flavors. While this is usually done in a controlled manner, it is possible for a wine to end up with more fizziness than intended.

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Now, I’d like to share a personal experience that I had with fizzy wine. A few months ago, I purchased a bottle of red wine from a local winery. As I poured myself a glass, I noticed that it had a slight fizz. At first, I was taken aback and worried that the wine had gone bad. However, after doing some research and reaching out to the winery, I learned that it was a natural occurrence due to the winemaking process. The winemaker explained that they intentionally included a small amount of carbon dioxide to enhance the wine’s freshness and brightness.

In conclusion, if you find your wine to be fizzy when it shouldn’t be, there are a few potential explanations. It could be due to refermentation in the bottle, a faulty closure, or intentional winemaking techniques. While it can be surprising at first, it’s important to remember that not all fizzy wines are bad or flawed. In fact, some fizzy wines can be delightful and refreshing. So, next time you encounter a fizzy wine, embrace the carbonation and enjoy the unique experience it brings to your glass.

John has been a hobbyist winemaker for several years, with a few friends who are winery owners. He writes mostly about winemaking topics for newer home vintners.
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